Objective information about financial planning, investments, and retirement plans

Robo Advisors – A Brave New World?

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The piece below is written by Doug Dahmer and originally appeared under the title “Robo-Advisors” – rise of the machines on Jon Chevreau’s site Financial Independence Hub.  Jon is at the forefront of a movement he calls “Findependence.”  This is essentially looking at becoming financially independent so that you can pursue the lifestyle of your choosing.   Jon is a Canadian author and journalist, check out his book Findependence Day.  Jon has contributed several prior posts here as well. 

I know Isaac Asimov’s Three Laws of Robotics, I read Arthur C. Clarke’s 2001: A Space Odyssey and I love the Terminator movies (I’ll be back!).

From all this I know three things: Robots are very smart. Robots always start off to help you. Robots have a tendency to turn on you.

One of the newest crazes and buzzwords in personal finance is: “Robo-Adviser.” If you’re not familiar with the term, it refers to investment management by algorithm in the absence of human input.

With a “Robo” you are asked to complete an on-line risk assessment questionnaire. Your responses determines the prescribed portfolio of ETFs (Exchange-Traded Funds) with a built-in asset allocation best suited to your needs. Once a year the portfolio is rebalanced to this prescribed asset allocation recipe. 

Dynamics change as shift from Saving to Spending

The “Robo” approach relies heavily upon a basic “buy/hold/rebalance” investment strategy. This passive strategy can work to your advantage during your accumulation years. These are the years when time is your friend, and dollar cost averaging through market cycles offers the opportunity to give your returns a boost.

However, as we get older and begin to prepare for and transition into our spending years, things change. Unfortunately, too few people realize that the investment strategies that served us well during our savings years turn on their head and work to our disadvantage as the flow of funds reverses and savings turns to spending. 

Dollar Cost Ravaging

Suddenly time changes from friend to foe where “dollar cost averaging” turns to “dollar cost ravaging” or what we call, the Mathematics of Catastrophe. (More about which in our next Hub blog). During the second half of your life the simplistic money management approach followed by “Robo- Advisers” can start to look like a “deed of the devil.”

Another concern is that “Robos” are unable to deal with the reality of expense variability. If you believe that in retirement, a fixed, annual withdrawal rate from a diversified portfolio will address your income needs I can with confidence suggest you are at best short-changing yourself and at worst setting yourself up for a cataclysmic financial failure.

I have been in this business a long time and know beyond a shadow of a doubt that a properly constructed life plan is very important in the second half of your life. It is only when you know what you want to do, when you want to do it and what it will cost to do it, that you can start to build the financial framework to make it happen.

Only through your life plan are you able to anticipate years of surplus and years of deficits and take the steps to bend them to your benefit. You need to bring together cash flow optimization, tax management and pension style investment management to make it happen and in the process add hundreds of thousands of dollars to your lifetime assets and cash flow. 

Robos ill equipped to link life to investment plan

Linking your life plan to your investment plan is the secret to success, but “robo investing” is not equipped to handle the nuances of that linkage. A Retirement Income Specialist knows that the type of money management you need is much more complex where the cash-flow demands outlined in your life plan need are linked to your investment plan. Tax planning, income optimization and risk mitigation means it is dangerous to leave your investment management running on auto-pilot.

Isaac Asimov’s first law of robotics holds that: A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.

“Robo-adviser” firms would do well to review this law. When it comes to investors heading into the second half of their lives, “Robo Advisers” may well be about to break it. 

Doug Dahmer, CFP, is founder and CEO of Emeritus Retirement Income Specialists. With offices in Toronto and Burlington, Emeritus’ C3 process is one of the industry’s most comprehensive retirement planning processes. 

Online financial advisors or Robo Advisors are popping up all over the place and if you believe the financial press they are the future of financial advice.  In part I believe they are or will at least shape the future of financial advice.  I weighed in on this topic recently via  Is An Online Financial Advisor Right For You? for Investopedia.

Please feel free to contact me with your questions.  

Check out an online service like Personal Capital  to manage all of your investment and retirement accounts all in one place. Please check out our Resources page for more tools and services that you might find useful.

What I’m Reading – Jay Cutler Superstar Edition

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Far too much time on the local newscasts has been devoted to the demotion of quarterback Jay Cutler to backup for this week’s game against the Detroit Lions.  The Bears have had a dismal season and the very sub-par play of Cutler has been cited almost universally among fans and the media as a main cause.

What I’m Reading – Jay Cutler Superstar Edition

For those who don’t follow the NFL it should be noted that Cutler signed a huge contract extension just this past January that made him the highest paid quarterback in the league.  This means he makes more than Aaron Rodgers, Peyton Manning and Drew Brees to name a few.

As a finance blogger how could I refer to him as anything less than a superstar, a financial superstar to be precise?  His agent clearly did a masterful selling job on the Bears. This is likely why the Bears last great quarterback was a gentleman named Sid Luckman back in the 1940s.

Full disclosure I am an avid Green Bay Packers fan and love the dysfunction that is the Chicago Bears.

In the spirit of Jay Cutler’s superstar agent here are some financial articles that you might find interesting.

3 Reasons Not to Raid Your Retirement Accounts by Eric McWhinnie via Retirement Cheat Sheet.

Retirement vs College Saving in a Nutshell by Jim Blankenship at his blog Financial Ducks in a Row.

The World Economy In 2015 Will Carry Troubling Echoes Of The Late 1990s according to The Economist via Business Insider.

Opinion: The hidden truth about rebalancing your portfolio by Mark Hulbert via Marketwatch.

5 RMD Pitfalls to Avoid by Christine Benz via Morningstar.

Why Does Everybody Recommend Complex Portfolios? by Mike Piper at his blog Oblivious Investor.

14 Holiday Activities to Build Wealth and Memories by Barbara Friedberg at her blog Barbara Friedberg Personal Finance.

I continue in my role as a contributor to Investopedia and here are my last three articles for them:

Is An Online Financial Advisor Right For You?

How To Manage A Cash Windfall

Tips For Managing Inflation In Retirement

Here’s hoping for a long Packers run through the playoffs.  Is that Jay Cutler I hear laughing all the way to the bank?

Check out an online service like Personal Capital to manage all of your accounts all in one place or purchase the latest version of Quicken.  Check out our Resources page for more tools and services that you might find useful.

Photo source:  Mike Shadle and Wikipedia

My Top 10 Most Read Posts of 2014

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It’s hard to believe that 2014 is almost over.  I hope that it has been a good year for you and your families.

Readership here at The Chicago Financial Planner has increased every year since I started blogging back in 2009 for which I thank you my readers.  My hope is that some of the articles, whether written by me or by some of the excellent guest authors who have contributed their insights, have been useful and informative to you.

Here are my top 10 most read posts during 2014:

Life Insurance as a Retirement Savings Vehicle – A Good Idea?

4 Signs of a Lousy 401(k) Plan

Small Business Retirement Plans – SEP-IRA vs. Solo 401(k)

401(k) Fee Disclosure and the American Funds

My Thoughts on PBS Frontline The Retirement Gamble

Using Retirement Accounts to Pay Off Debt – A good Idea?

4 Reasons to Accept Your Company’s Buyout Offer

7 Retirement Savings Tips to Help Avoid Regret

Is a $100,000 a Year Retirement Doable?

5 Reasons to Consider a Solo 401(k)

Additionally I recently started writing for Investopedia, here is a link to my contributor page which includes links to all of my contributions to the site.

I want to thank all of my readers again.  I also invite you to contact me to ask any questions that you might have, to tell me what you like or don’t like about the site, and to suggest topics that you would like to see covered here in the future.

I hope that you and your family have a great holiday season.

7 Reasons to Avoid 401(k) Loans

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One of the features of many 401(k) plans is the ability for participants to take a loan against their balance.  There are rules governing what the loans can be used for, the number of loans that can be outstanding at one time, and the percentage of your account balance that can be borrowed.  Additionally there is a time limit by which these loans need to be repaid.

It is the decision of the organization sponsoring the plan whether or not to allow loans and also as to what they can be used for.  Typical reasons allowed are for college expenses for your children, medical expenses, the purchase of a home, or to prevent eviction from your home.

The flexibility offered by allowing loans is often touted as one of the good features of the 401(k).  However taking a loan from your 401(k) also carries some downsides.  Here are 7 reasons to avoid 401(k) loans.  

Leaving your job triggers repayment 

If you leave your job with an outstanding loan against your 401(k) account the balance can become due and payable immediately.  This applies whether you leave your job voluntarily or involuntarily via some sort of termination.  While your regularly scheduled repayments are deducted from your paycheck, you will need to come up with the funds to repay the loan upon leaving your job or it will become a taxable distribution.  Additionally if you are under 59 ½ a 10% penalty might also apply.

Opportunity costs in a rising market

While loan repayments do carry an interest component which you essentially pay to yourself, the interest rate might be much lower than what you might have earned on your investments in the plan during a rising stock market.  Obviously this will depend upon the market conditions and how you would have invested the money.  This can lead to a lower balance at retirement resulting in a lower standard of living or possibly necessitating that you work longer than you had planned.

There are fees involved 

There are often fees for loan origination, administration, and maintenance which you will be responsible for paying.

Interest is not tax deductible 

Even if the purpose of the loan is to purchase your principal residence interest on 401(k) loans is not tax-deductible.

No flexibility in the repayment terms 

The loan payments are taken from your paycheck which all things being equal will reduce the amount of money you bring home each pay period.  If you run into financial difficulty you cannot change the terms of the loan repayment.

You might be tempted to reduce your 401(k) deferrals 

The fact that you now have to repay the loan from your paycheck might cause you to reduce the amount you are saving for retirement via your salary deferral to the plan.

You will have less at retirement 

A loan against your 401(k) plan will result in lower nest egg at retirement.  Given the difficulty many in the United States already have in accumulating a sufficient amount for retirement this only adds to the problem.

You should especially avoid 401(k) loans if:

  • You are near retirement
  • You feel that your job security is in jeopardy
  • You are planning to leave your job in the near future
  • You are already behind in saving for retirement
  • You have other sources to obtain the money you need
  • You feel that repaying the loan will be financial hardship 

Look life happens and sometimes taking a loan from your 401(k) plan can’t be avoided.  The economy has been tough for many over the past few years.  However if at all possible avoid taking a 401(k) loan and rather let that money grow for your retirement.  Down the road you will be glad you did.

Please feel free to contact me with your questions. 

Check out an online service like Personal Capital to manage all of your accounts all in one place.  Also check out our Resources page for more tools and services that you might find useful.

What I’m Reading-Packers Reign Supreme Edition

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It’s Cyber Monday (can you say contrived promotional event) and I have already been to O’Hare to drop my daughter off.  Amazing how crowded it was even at 5 AM.

Great football games over the holiday weekend, but none better than the Packers beating the Patriots yesterday in what was deemed a Super Bowl preview.  Feels good now but the next week is another game.

Here are a few financial articles I suggest for some good Post-Thanksgiving financial reading:

Jim Blankenship offers some Year-End Charitable Giving Tips at Getting Your Financial Ducks in a Row.

Mike Piper answers a reader question Which Accounts Should I Spend From Each Year In Retirement? at Oblivious Investor.

Christine Benz provides an example of A Conservative Retirement Saver Portfolio for ETF Investors at Morningstar.com.

Larry Light shared a piece from financial advisor and blogger Jeff Rose Make Your Money Last In Retirement (Pt. 2) at Forbes.

Ben Steverman writes Hedge Funds Lose Money for Everyone, Not Just the Rich at Bloomberg.

John Wasik shares Five Ways to Protect Yourself on Cyber Monday at Forbes.

For now the Packers reign supreme but the Falcons visit Lambeau for next week’s Monday Night game and they will pose a tough challenge.  Enjoy Cyber Monday and the rest of the week.

Are You Ready For Retirement?

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To my readers:

The infographic that was originally included in this post was taken down as was the link to the firm that supplied it due to a malware warning on their site.  Please check out the many other posts on this site in the retirement category and other categories that may interest you.  I apologize for any inconvenience but your online safety in viewing my site is of the utmost importance to me.

Original post without reference to the infographic

Happy Thanksgiving to all of you and to your families.  We are thankful for having all five of us home together and the time we get to spend as family. For anyone with adult kids you know that doesn’t happen as often as we might like sometimes.

As I write this we are sitting out Black Friday as we always do and looking forward to a weekend filled with family, great leftovers, and football. Especially on Sunday when I am hoping for a Packer victory over the Partriots at Lambeau Field.

Retirement is a journey.  I can’t think of a better time to get started or to gauge your progress than now no matter what your age.  Why not take some time over the last month of year to ensure that you hit the ground running in 2015?