Objective information about financial planning, investments, and retirement plans

Mutual Fund Expenses – Where Real Holiday Savings Can be Found

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Blue Piggy Bank With Coins - Retirement

As I write this its Cyber Monday, the biggest online shopping day of the year.  Where to save a few dollars on this item or that has been the focus of many news stories and discussion.  While we all like to save money on the things we buy, these savings are “chump change” compared with the savings opportunities available by reducing your expenses on the mutual fund and ETFs in which you invest.  Here are 5 tips for reducing your investing costs for mutual funds and ETFs to help grow your investments for retirement, college savings, and other goals.

Index Funds are Not Created Equal

As an example the Dreyfus Mid Cap Index Fund (ticker PESPX) has an expense ratio of 0.50% which is pricey for a core index fund of this type.  The Investor Share Class of the Vanguard Mid Cap Index Fund (VIMSX) carries an expense ratio of 0.24% and the SPDR S&P Midcap 400 ETF (MDY) has an expense ratio of 0.25%.  An investment of $10,000 in each of these funds made on May 31, 1998 and held until October 31, 2012 would have grown to:

Dreyfus Mid Cap Index

$30,743

SPDR Midcap

$31,643

Vanguard Mid Cap Index

$31,770

The above information is via Morningstar and is based upon the earliest common inception date of the three funds and also assumes reinvestment of dividends and distributions.  Note that an investment in one of the lower cost share classes of the Vanguard fund would yield even better results.

ETF Price Wars are a Good Thing

There is a price war happening among several providers initiated by Schwab to offer the lowest cost ETF.  Vanguard has jumped on the bandwagon by changing the index provider on many of its funds and ETFs; Blackrock’s ishares unit has also joined in.  While I likely would not suggest switching from an already low cost index ETF product because it is not the absolute lowest in cost, I would suggest taking a look at the offerings of the “warring” factions.  You should also take any transaction fees into account as well.  Schwab and Vanguard allow transaction free trading of their own ETFs, TD and Fidelity offer a menu of transaction free ETFs as well.

Your Financial Advisor May be able to Save You Money

In many cases I am able to invest my client’s money in less expensive share classes of a given mutual fund than they might be able to purchase on their own.  As an example PIMco Commodity Real Return as a number of share classes as do most of the PIMco Funds.  I am able to invest client dollars in the Institutional Share Class (PCRIX) with its 0.74% expense ratio and typical $1 million minimum.  This compares to the no-load D shares (PCRDX) with an expense ratio of 1.19% and a $1,000 minimum initial investment.  Often the savings in expense ratios that I can provide to my clients can go a long way in covering a portion of my professional fees.

Ensure that Your Stock Broker or Registered Rep isn’t costing you Money

The flip side of the last point is to make sure that you are not paying more in mutual fund fees just so that your broker or registered rep can make additional fees and commissions.  Case in point is if your money is invested in a proprietary mutual fund offered by the rep’s employer.  While some of these proprietary funds can be decent, all too often they are under performers that are laden with fees and charges to generate revenue for the broker and their firm.

Read your 401(k) Plan Fee Disclosures

Some plans sold by commissioned reps and producing TPAs (Third-Party Administrators) may contain funds that are not very low cost.  Case in point might be a plan with an American Funds fund in the R1, R2, or R3 share classes.  This might also be the case with some Fidelity shares classes (typically the Advisor share class), as well as with some T. Rowe Price funds (the Advisor or the R share classes).  These shares exist typically to compensate a producer.  If you see these or similar share classes for other fund families in your plan it would behoove you to ask the person who administers your plan if it might be possible to move the plan into lower cost funds or fund share classes.

We all like to find a bargain when doing our holiday shopping.  If a fraction of the time and effort that people spend on this activity went into analyzing their investment portfolios, the potential cost savings alone would dwarf anything that you might realize from finding a couple of deals this holiday season.  These savings are not just one-time in nature, but they “keep on giving.”

Check out Morningstar to review the expenses for all of  your mutual funds and ETFs and to get a free trial for their premium services.

Please feel free to contact me with questions about your investments.

Photo credit: Flickr

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Much to be Thankful For

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Thanksgiving is a time to reflect on life and to give thanks.  In my case I’m most thankful for my family.  My wife of 28+ years Kyung is pictured below with two very bored Chicago Police Officers this past June over the weekend in which NATO met here in Chicago.  We had hoped to see some “real live” protesters but we were too far north (this photo looks east from the Wrigley Building) and several hours too early. 

I am also thankful for our three great kids.  I couldn’t be more proud of each of them.  The best part of the holiday is that we will all be under the same roof (assuming no airline glitches for my oldest Jen who lives in LA). 

Blogging

I’m thankful that people actually read this blog and have some interest in what I have to say.  Blogging is like coming full circle for me.  Back in high school my career interest test indicated that being a lawyer, funeral director, or an author were the three most likely career paths.

Being a Financial Advisor

I’m thankful to have had the opportunity to work in such an interesting and challenging profession for the past 14 years.  I’ve been blessed with wonderful clients and I’ve enjoyed contributing to their success.

The past 14 years have been challenging in terms of the economic environment we’ve faced and I’m sure the next 14 years will be equally challenging.  I can honestly say that even the worst day as a financial advisor beats the heck out of the best day spent in the corporate world.

Having gone down the path of being a fee-only advisor and having later joined NAPFA (the largest professional organization of fee-only advisors in the country) I’ve had the pleasure to meet and learn from some of the finest, most dedicated financial advisors around.

Personally and professionally I feel very thankful and blessed.  Now on to tomorrow’s food fest.  As much as I adore my kids they had better keep their mitts off of my drumstick.  There is nothing better than cold, leftover turkey drumstick dipped in barbecue sauce.

I hope that you and your family have a great Thanksgiving.  As always please feel free to contact me with any and all questions.

Mutual Funds – B Shares are a Dumb Ox

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I’m guessing that our family is no different from most in that we have some unique ways of communicating.  For example, beef tenderloin was a dish that my wife would make on a number of special occasions as the kids were growing up.  She cooked it in a black roasting pan with white specs, hence beef tenderloin is forever know as “polka dot pot meat” in the Wohlner house (the black roasting pan is long gone).

 English: Oxen in Marine Drive, Mumbai, India.

In this same vein, the word oxymoron has been changed to “Dumb Ox” in Wohlner speak.

Several years ago I was having lunch with a CPA who was also licensed as Broker Dealer and sold securities including loaded mutual funds to some of the firm’s clients.  I’ve never understood how a trusted advisor like a CPA could turn around and sell financial products for a commission, but that is for another post.  Over lunch the CPA said “… I know that you will disagree, but I often think there is nothing better for many clients than a good B Share…”   He’s right I do disagree, to me a “Good B Share” is the ultimate “Dumb Ox” (no offense to any Oxen intended).

Share Class Comparisons

In the world of commission and fee-based financial product sellers, one way for these brokers and registered reps to be compensated is via commissions from selling mutual funds.  The main share classes where this occurs are A, B, and C Shares.  Using the American Funds Growth Fund as an example let’s take a look at the differences in these three share classes:

Share Class Ticker Front Load Deferred Load Expense Ratio 12b-1 fee
A AGTHX 5.75% 0% 0.71% 0.24%
B AGRBX 0% 5.00% 1.46% 1.00%
C GFACX 0% 1.00% 1.49% 1.00%

Source:  Morningstar.com

The American Funds, like an increasing number of fund companies no longer sells B share mutual funds.  However, even if there are no new B shares being sold; many investors are still trapped in the overpriced funds by the surrender charges.

With the A shares, a $10,000 investment would incur an upfront sales charge of $575, meaning that $9,425 would be invested in your account.

The No Front Load Option – B Shares

As an alternative for investors who didn’t want to pay the upfront sales charge B shares were created.  While there is no upfront sales charge and the entire $10,000 is invested, the ongoing expenses of the fund are considerably higher.  Additionally you are literally trapped in the fund by the deferred sales charge which starts at 5% and declines by 1% each year until it goes away altogether in year 6.  While you can generally exchange your fund for another B share fund in the same fund family, you will get hit with the surrender charge should you sell any or all of the shares.  At the end of the surrender period the B shares are supposed to revert to the less expensive A shares.  I’ve heard of instances where B shares were not automatically moved to the A shares, it is always a good idea to read your brokerage statements.

What if I still own B shares?

If you hold B shares of any fund family I suggest the following:

  • If your fund has moved out of the surrender period and has not moved to the less expensive A shares call your financial advisor and ask why.
  • If your fund is still in the surrender period do a cost/benefit analysis to determine if moving out of the fund and buying into a less expensive (and presumably better performing) alternative would be cost effective.  Basically you want to look at the difference in the annual expenses of the B share fund vs. the alternative and determine how long it would take you to breakeven after incurring the surrender charges based on the cost savings.
  • Consider firing the financial advisor and the firm that put you into the B share in the first place.  I’ve been in this business a long time and I can’t see any reason to have put a client into a B share except greed (though I’m open to listening to other explanations).  The ongoing payments to the brokerage firm (the 12b-1 portion of the expense ratio) and the “handcuffs” placed on shareholders by the surrender charges are quite lucrative for the broker, and serve to reduce your returns.  At the very least confront the advisor and ask them why you were sold a B share in the first place.
  • I’m biased on this subject and in the interest of full disclosure I am a fee-only financial advisor and I do not accept commissions or sales loads of any kind.

As always, be sure that you understand ALL expenses and fees that you will be paying when working with a financial advisor.  What you don’t know can really reduce your investment returns.

Please contact me with any thoughts or suggestions about anything you’ve read here at The Chicago Financial Planner. Don’t miss any future posts, please subscribe via email. Please check out our resources page as well.  

Photo credit:  Wikipedia

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Mutual Funds-Should You Pay Extra for Active Management?

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I was recently quoted in the industry publication Investment News in an article discussing how many Large CapCommon Sense on Mutual Funds: New Imperatives ... domestic equity mutual funds have become very highly correlated with their benchmark index.

The article’s author cited the American Funds Growth Fund of America as an example with its three year R-squared to the Russell 1000 Index having increased to 98% from 77% just five years ago.  R-squared measures the strength of the statistical relationship, in this case between the fund and its benchmark.

Here are my two quotes from the article:

“If I buy an active fund in the large-cap space, I want somebody who’s going to do something over the long term to outperform,” said Roger Wohlner, a financial planner at Asset Strategy Consultants. “Why pay 70 or 80 basis points for active management that doesn’t give you much differentiation from the index?” 

“Downside protection is one of the reasons that led Mr. Wohlner to rush some of his clients into the $5.5 billion Sequoia Fund (SEQUX) when it briefly opened to new investors in 2008. As the S&P 500 fell 37% in 2008, the Sequoia Fund fell 27%.” 

Both quotes reflect my belief that an active mutual fund manager needs to add value beyond what you can find in an index mutual fund or ETF.

Index Funds Often Outperform Their Actively Managed Peers

Especially with Large Cap funds, quite often index funds out perform a large percentage of their actively managed peers.  Let’s look at an example:

Vanguard Growth Index Signal (VIGSX) – Large Growth Category

YTD

1 year

3 years

5 years

10 years

Fund Return

10.77%

6.49%

17.66%

3.06%

5.97%

Category percentile

24

8

14

17

28

# Funds in category

1,543

1,499

1,328

1,137

736

As of June 30, 2012 via Fi360.com

By way of explanation:

  • Category percentile represents its ranking among all of the mutual funds and ETFs in this Morningstar Category.  For example for the three years ended June 30 the fund ranked in the top 14% of the 1,328 funds in the category with a three year track record.
  • The fund delivered these results quite cheaply.  The fund’s expense ratio is 0.10%.  This compares to the average mutual fund/ETF in this category of 1.22% as reported by Morningstar.
  • While this share class may not be available to all individual investors, the Admiral Share class ($10,000 minimum investment) and the ETF version (which can be traded commission-free at Vanguard) of this fund also carry a 0.10% expense ratio.  Even the basic Investor share class is very cheap to own with a $3,000 minimum investment and a 0.24% expense ratio.  In addition there are many other excellent index ETFs in this category that are solid low cost choices.

Why Pick an Actively Managed Fund? 

A bit over half of the money that I have invested on behalf of my clients is in some sort of index product, across both mutual funds and ETFs.

That said I still use a number of actively managed mutual funds as well.  What am I looking for in an active fund?

  • A long-term track record of excellence.  There are still a number of active fund managers who in my opinion add value.
  • A manager who excels at controlling their fund’s downside risk when the markets drop.
  • Superior management in an investment style that is not well-represented by index products.

As we have seen especially over the market cycle of the past decade, it is increasingly difficult for actively managed mutual funds to add value to investors over and above what inexpensive index funds deliver.   This is especially true with equity funds.  If your financial advisor suggests a portfolio of pricey actively managed mutual funds ask why (especially if these funds are proprietary products of their employer).  What added value do these funds provide over less expensive index alternatives?  If you advisor is paid all or in part via commissions I’ll bet his/her compensation is part of the answer.

Please feel free to contact me with your investing and financial planning questions.

For you do-it-yourselfers, check out Morningstar.com to analyze your investments and to get a free trial for their premium services.  Please check out our Resources page for links to some additional tools and services that might be beneficial to you.

Photo credit: Wikipedia

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Why Financial Planning is Important-An Illustration

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Over the years I’ve written several posts on this blog about the importance of personal financial planning.  Now courtesy of NAPFA (National Association of Personal Financial Advisors, the largest organization of fee-only financial advisors in the country) I can show you.  The infographic below does a great job of diagramming the need for financial planning and how the financial planning process works.  The statistics are sobering and illustrate the need for many Americans to seek the help of a qualified financial planner.


 

Please contact me with any thoughts or suggestions about anything you’ve read here at The Chicago Financial Planner

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Is Your Financial Advisor Like a Replacement Ref?

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By now you’ve all seen the replay of the horrible call at the end of Monday night’s football game that gave the Seattle Seahawks a “victory” over my beloved Green Bay Packers.   In the interest of full disclosure I am a lifelong Packer fan.  This love affair with the Pack began towards the end of the 1966 season (I was nine) a season in which they won the first Super Bowl; Vince Lombardi was the coach; and Bart Starr and eight other players from this team would end up in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.  I’ve seen some great wins and some disappointing losses over the past 45 years.   Beyond the botched call on Monday, the whole tone of the games with these unqualified replacement refs is just hard to watch.

Update as of late September 26, 2012 the NFL announced that a tentative deal with the real refs had been reached and hopefully we will never see anything as shameful as this episode again.

Unqualified and incompetent referees in the NFL are discouraging, but an unqualified financial advisor can cause some real harm to you.

Is your advisor qualified?  The ref who signaled touchdown on that last play clearly was not.  He had never officiated a game above the junior college level before this NFL season.  Typically an NFL official must have at least five years experience at the college level.  As far as your financial advisor, ask yourself if she is qualified to advise you on your situation.  Does she take a holistic view of your financial situation or does she simply try to sell you more financial products?  Moreover does your advisor have the proper credentials such as the Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) designation?

Does your financial advisor collaborate with other professionals on your behalf?   One of the comments made by several of the experts on ESPN and other networks is that the head referee never called over the two officials who made the conflicting calls in the end zone to hear their explanations.  One of these experts is a former league referee and he indicated this should have occurred as a matter of course.  As a financial advisor I often tap the expertise of financial advisor colleagues and other professionals in areas like estate planning and insurance on behalf of my clients.  I consider myself a financial planning generalist, but I also know what I don’t know.  The key is doing the best job that I can for my clients.  Does your advisor take this approach?  If not why not?

Does your advisor place your interests first?  Clearly the NFL doesn’t really care about its fans or for that matter its players.  Why else would they put out such a cheapened product for the first three weeks of the season and put their players potentially at greater risk of injury?  It’s all about the money and the NFL is raking it in.  Likewise many financial advisors are all about the sale of financial and insurance products.  They are strictly out for the money; their client’s interests come second.  For many commissioned and fee-based advisors this is both the norm and perfectly legal as they are not held to a Fiduciary standard.  I’m biased, look for a fee-only advisor who holds him or herself out as a Fiduciary and who puts their client’s interests first.

Let’s hope the NFL settles their labor differences soon.  But more importantly, make sure that you have a first stringer as your financial advisor.

Please feel free to contact me with your investing and financial planning questions. 

Please check out our Resources page for links to some tools and services that might be beneficial to you.

Photo credit:  Reuters

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How much is Financial Advice Worth?

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A fellow NAPFA advisor  and I were pondering this question this morning.

Retirement

Our meeting was centered upon marketing our 401(k) participant advice services to employers, individuals, and related service providers.  In our minds people should be beating our doors down given the general state of retirement readiness in this country.

The interesting obstacle that we’ve encountered is a resistance among many plan participants to pay for advice, with fees starting as low as $400 per year.  Both of us run our own separate practices that focus on moderate to high net individuals, and in my case also to retirement plan sponsors, foundations, and endowments.  These folks are used to paying fees and the level of the fees we ask are usually not a surprise to these clients.

We came up with two great questions in terms of the 401(k) participant advice market.  How much is financial advice worth?  Is your financial future worth $400?

I recently needed a new water heater, and we paid upwards of $1,500 for the water heater and the labor to install it.  Given that this is not an area of expertise for me, and the fact that working with our gas connection made me very uncomfortable this seemed like money well-spent.

Depending upon their specialty and your location, an attorney might charge $250 -$500 per hour.  If you find yourself in a situation requiring their legal expertise, most of us wouldn’t bat an eye at these fees.

People routinely spend $1,000; $2,000; or more on a vacation.  This is money well-spent; I know that our adult children still talk about some of the family vacations we took when they were younger.

So how much is competent, unbiased financial advice worth?  Part of the answer lies in the benefit that you expect to receive from spending the money.  I ask the question rhetorically because we really want input.  Please leave a comment with your thoughts; we’d really love to know what you think.

As always please feel free to contact me with your financial planning questions and concerns.

 

Photo credit: 401(K) 2012

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Financial Advice – Have it Your Way

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I spent most of today at a seminar conducted by Marie Swift, a marketing and communications guru for financial

Current "blue crescent" logo (July 1...

advisors.  Marie, assisted by her son, did a great job of educating us and stimulating the thought process.  One key takeaway is that content directed to clients and prospects should be all about them, not us the advisor.  This is also true when it comes to the delivery of financial advice.

You are the consumer of professional financial advice, why shouldn’t you have it your way?  I don’t like guacamole and our local Mexican restaurant is glad to put mine on the side so I can give to wife or son.

All too often, investors complain that they can’t or don’t receive the services they need from their financial advisor.

I’ve written often on this blog, US News, and elsewhere that everyone should have a Fee-Only Advisor who takes a comprehensive view of their situation.  That is my service model and it is the right one for my ongoing clients.  That doesn’t mean that it is the right model for your needs and your situation.

With the advent of several online advice sites there are many delivery models that you can consider.  A good place to start is to take stock of where you might need financial help.

  • Are you looking for someone to analyze your overall situation, tell you what you are doing well, and offer actionable suggestions for areas that need improvement?
  • Are you looking for someone to manage your investments using asset allocation and low cost index mutual funds/ETFs?
  • Are you seeking comprehensive ongoing wealth management advice?
  • Do you have just a few issues and would like to work with someone on an “as needed” basis?
  • Do you want to sit down face-to-face with an advisor several times per year to review your investments and overall situation?
  • Are you comfortable doing your own investing and financial planning, but would like to be able to run ideas by a professional on occasion?
  • Are you comfortable working with an advisor remotely?
  • Are you looking for a low cost online solution?
  • Are you concerned about how your advisor is compensated?  About any potential conflicts of interest that may come with their compensation structure?
  • How and how often would you like to be contacted by your advisor?

These questions and many others should be considered when looking for financial advice and the method of delivery for this advice.

Please feel free to contact me with any general questions you may have or if you are interested in learning more about the services I offer.

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Should you Micromanage Your Mutual Fund Manager?

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I routinely receive a number of press requests via email during the course of the week.  I delete the vast majority of them because I either do not feel qualified to comment or I’m just not interested in being quoted.  However I did receive one today to which I did send a few thoughts to the reporter seeking input.

My Investments from the last year or so

He was seeking comments on:

“….financial planners who are surprised or have an opinion on some of the mutual funds that decided to buy Facebook stock in its first two weeks of trading. The monthly portfolio holdings for some fund families have been released in the last couple weeks.

Is it expected for some core mutual fund holdings (including those in 401ks) to participate in a volatile IPO like Facebook? Should Value or Dividend funds (have) picked up the stock, as a few did? Some funds have as much as a 5% to 7% allocation to the stock, is that worrisome?

Some of the funds that bought the stock between May 18 and May 31 include: …” 

My email response to this reporter was:

In the case of actively managed mutual funds such as the ones mentioned in the press request below, for better or worse you are buying into the judgment and skill of the manager or management team.  I would tend to evaluate the fund’s performance over time, their expenses, risk, adherence to a style, and other factors.  I wouldn’t necessarily look at their having bought Facebook during the IPO phase or any other singular holding.  Managers make some good bets and some that aren’t so good.  At this juncture it is a bit early to judge these purchases; however my focus would again be in the aggregate.  Have they made far more good bets vs. poor ones? 

The point of my response was that if one purchases an actively managed mutual fund (or separate account, annuity sub-account, closed-end fund, ETF, etc.) they are buying that manager’s skill and their ability to achieve some expected result.

There is a whole other debate about whether an investor should stick with lower cost index funds and ETFs vs. actively managed funds and that is not the point of this article.  For the record I am a fan of both, I use a high percentage of index products in my client portfolios but I also use a fair number of active funds as well.  As an advisor I have one advantage that many individual investors may not have in that I have access to institutional and other lower cost share classes for a number of the funds that I use both active and index.

In my opinion if you are looking at an actively managed fund you should evaluate the “whole picture.”  Typically when evaluating a fund, the starting points of my analysis include:

  • Track record relative to its peers.  It’s useless to compare a mid cap growth manager to one who invests in foreign large value stocks.  Note a stellar track record may not indicate success going forward so it is incumbent upon you to look further and understand what is behind that track record.  For example, how did this fund do on a relative basis in both up and down markets?
  • Expenses, how does the fund compare to its peers?
  • Alpha and Sharpe ratio.  These are measurements of the fund’s risk-adjusted return and to me are indicators of the value (or lack thereof) added by the manager.
  • Management tenure.  It is not uncommon for a successful fund manager to move on to greener pastures, especially if wooed by a competitor.  If the manager(s) who compiled the fund’s great track record are gone this is a big red flag, though not always a deal killer.  A number of years ago the long-time manager of a foreign fund that I like left.  Two of her underlings took over and frankly I think they have done an even better job.  Investing is about people, but it’s also about process.
  • Gain or loss of assets.  This is huge, especially if the fund invests in small or mid cap stocks.  Many funds have compiled a great track record with a low asset base.  One of the truisms of investing is that money chases performance.  Once a fund does well, new money can often poor in.  It can be tough for the manager to find enough good ideas in which to invest this new money.  Case in point is Fidelity Magellan.  This fund was managed by the legendary Peter Lynch and posted some fantastic numbers.  Money poured in, Lynch left, and the fund has been decidedly mediocre for a number of years.

These items are a starting point when researching an actively managed fund.  Overall my job is to develop portfolios for my individual and institutional (retirement plans, endowments, and foundations) clients that fit their needs.  Mutual funds and ETFs are the tools that I use.  I rely on the managers of these funds and ETFs and I judge them on their overall performance, not on any one individual holding or transaction.

If you need help evaluating your investments or with your financial planning  please feel free to contact me to discuss your situation.

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The Similarities Between Buying Coffee and Choosing a Financial Planner

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Choosing a Financial Planner

A couple of years ago my family bought me a Keurig single cup coffee maker. I love the ability to make a freshly brewed cup on-demand; the convenience has served to fuel my already robust coffee addiction.

Our local Sam’s Club sells a variety of K-Cup brands; they typically are boxes of 80 for around $37. Starbucks recently entered the K-Cup market so when I saw their box for sale at Sam’s I bought one. It wasn’t until I opened it a few days later that I noticed there were only 54 individual units for the same $37 price. It was clearly marked on the box, but I was so used to boxes of 80 that I never noticed.

When looking for a financial planner it is also important to know what you are getting for your money before entering into any sort of relationship.

First you need to understand that anyone can call themselves a financial planner. This is no requirement that they have any particular training or credentials in order to hold themselves out as a financial planner.  Do they hold the CFP® certification or perhaps the PFS certification (the CPA’s financial planning certification)? There are an ever increasing number of certifications and designations in this field. Some are more meaningful than others so be sure ask many questions here.

Understand the services offered. Do they provide comprehensive financial planning; investment advice; or advice on an ad hoc basis? More importantly does the planner offer services that match your needs?

Understand how the planner will be compensated. Is this person truly a financial planner, or do they simply sell financial and insurance products? Are they paid an hourly fee, an ongoing retainer or percentage of the investment assets they will be managing for you, or some sort of fixed project fee? Is their compensation all or in part based upon the sale of financial products?

Understand the planner’s value proposition. What does he or she bring to the table that makes their services unique and right for you?

Just like my coffee buying experience, it is important that you fully understand who you are hiring as a financial planner, what they will and will not do for you, the benefits of hiring that person, and how much you will be paying for their services.

NAPFA (the largest professional organization for fee-only financial advisors) has published a guide to finding an advisor.

As always please feel free to contact me  if I can be of help.

Check out our Resources page for links to some tools and services that might be beneficial to you.

Photo credit:  Wikipedia

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