Objective information about financial planning, investments, and retirement plans

Buying Life Insurance – 5 Questions to Ask

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This is post was written by Ike Devji, a Phoenix, AZ-based asset protection attorney and one of my oldest online friends.  I have spoken with Ike many times for advice on client-related issues and had the pleasure of meeting him in person a couple of years ago when he spoke to my financial advisor study group during a meeting we held in Phoenix.  Here Ike offers some practical advice to anyone who is considering buying life insurance.

Knowing the right questions to ask before buying life insurance is a key issue for consumers, especially considering the significant investment often involved and the exit costs involved in buying the wrong policy.

Covering all the options and nuances available in the life insurance marketplace in anything less than book form is nearly impossible. Here are 5 questions to ask before buying life insurance.

What is my annual premium and can it change?

This is the amount the insurance will cost you every year. In some cases the premium is fixed and in other cases it can change based on variety of factors such as the performance of the stock market and other indices. Make sure you understand your obligations before buying life insurance.   What you will lose or be left with if you don’t make what the policy expected and what was actually illustrated?

What does the policy illustration tell me?

I see lots of bold promises and spit-ball estimations of future performance made by insurance agents. The policy illustration is all that matters, so any conversation about what could happen if the policy exceeds the expectation that the illustration creates is moot; don’t engage in it and instead ask about the “minimum guarantees” if one exists at all. That’s the minimum you’ll earn in the policy if the worst happens. Remember, the column on the far right in most illustrations is the “perfect world” scenario, so look at and have the others explained as well.  Be sure to challenge all assumptions made in the policy illustration, as the saying goes if it sounds too good to be true it just might be.

Does this policy have a cash value?

The cash value is the amount of premium that builds up inside the policy and that may be available to the policy owner in the future. Some policies, like term insurance, have no cash value, while others have it immediately and some build it up over time. Be clear if yours does and exactly when it will be available if you need it and under what terms.

Roger’s comment:  Note that term insurance may be the appropriate vehicle for your needs.  Every situation is different; make sure that you are clear as to your reasons for buying the policy.  Life insurance is often a poor performing, high cost investment or retirement savings vehicle.  It may behoove you to pay only for the death benefit that you need and use more traditional investment vehicles for your investing and retirement savings needs.

Is my policy protected from creditors?

Know what the laws in your state of residence are and if your policy and both the cash value and “death benefit” (dollar amount paid upon your death) is protected by law or not. Asset protection of liquid assets is always a key focus of my concern. If the law is not in your favor, some simple trust planning can often protect your policy from both estate taxes and more active threats.

How long will my policies last, what is my exit strategy?

Again, this goes back to the illustration and specifies how long the coverage will be in place at a specific cost and what the death benefit will be through the term of the illustration. In some cases, keeping the policy alive may have significant increased costs while in others you may be able to reduce the death benefit to keep the premiums level or to stretch the policy for a longer period of years. Find out how flexible your policy will be in the future and weigh that as part of your risk-and-liquidity analysis.

Find out what happens if you can’t or don’t want to continue to make premium payments. With term insurance you usually lose what you paid; that’s OK, think of it the way you might car insurance. Other policies that were structured to have a future cash value or that have a current cash value early on however may have significant “surrender penalties.” Know what happens if you walk away and what options the policy may provide, including the specific surrender penalties that may be imposed in the policy. Do you have a need for life insurance in retirement for example?  The carrier could, for instance, keep all the cash value you built up if you don’t keep it for a minimum number of years.

This list just scratches the surface and is deceptively simple. Our goal here was to introduce some of the key concepts and questions you must be familiar with, so you can do your own due diligence when buying life insurance, whether a simple term policy or a complex premium-financed strategy with a triple-reverse galactic split dollar that includes a trip to the Bahamas to read the policy.

Roger’s comment:  Life insurance is a versatile and often complex financial tool that can have uses in estate planning, asset protection, as a business succession tool, and it can provide a death benefit to your family.  Make sure you fully understand why you are buying life insurance, don’t just succumb to a slick sales pitch.

Attorney Ike Devji has a decade of practice devoted exclusively to Asset Protection and Wealth Preservation planning. He works with a national client base including 1000’s of physicians and business owners often through their local attorney, CPA or financial advisor. Together, he and his associates protect billions of dollars in personal assets for these clients. Ike also regularly writes, teaches and speaks on these issues to executives, physicians and other professionals nationally. See his work in WORTH, Advisor Today, Physician’s Practice and at www.ProAssetProtection.Com. 

As always, the information presented here is general and educational and can never replace the advice of experienced counsel specific to your assets or situation.  

Please check out our Book Store for books on financial planning, retirement, and related topics as well as any Amazon shopping needs you may have (or just click on the link below).  The Chicago Financial Planner is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.  If you click on my Amazon.com links and buy anything, even something other than the product advertised, I earn a small fee, yet you don’t pay any extra. 

Dangerous Myths About Asset Protection

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This is post was written by Ike Devji, a Phoenix, AZ-based asset protection attorney and one of my oldest online friends.  I have spoken with Ike many times for advice on client asset protection issues and had the pleasure of meeting him in person a couple of years ago when he spoke to my financial advisor study group during a meeting we held in Phoenix.  Ike generally advises physicians and high income professionals, but these asset protection tips are relevant to all of us. 

I’ve spent the last eleven years of my practice helping successful Americans at all net worth levels protect and enjoy their hard earned wealth. A good part of that involves re-educating people about their money and their risks.  Below is a summary of the most common asset protection myths and mistakes top legal and financial planners want their clients to be concerned about.

Trumbull County Courthouse, Courthouse Square ...

I can do it later 

Asset Protection it best analogized to “net worth insurance” and like insurance you have the best, most effective and legally supportable options available to you when you implement the planning before a crisis exists. Transfer of assets into plans after you have specific exposures is costly, ineffective and some cases illegal (fraudulent conveyance). The best time to act is always now and every day that passes makes your planning stronger.

I’m not rich enough to worry about asset protection  

This is a sin I see committed on a weekly basis, often by professionals like lawyers, CPAs and financial advisors. These advisors often tell clients that they are not rich enough to do any planning and that that they should have a net worth north of five or even ten million dollars to consider it. Nothing could be further from the truth, especially if you are in the “Fall” of your earning career. Of course high net worth individuals must implement this kind of planning and always have, but all you have is important to you and there are precautions that can be taken at any net worth level. When should you start?

There are many simple ways to analyze this but here is an easy one, answer these questions: 

  • If you lost what you have today, or some significant portion of it, are you at an age, earning level and financial condition that will allow you to maintain your family’s goals and expenses?
  • Do you have assets that would be difficult or impossible to replace given your age, health and economic conditions?
  • Are you financially and legally prepared for a lawsuit that is either not covered by liability insurance or which often produces verdicts above the limit you are carrying?

No one can touch me because I have a “Trust”

Not a week passes when I don’t talk to someone who says, “I’ve got this covered, I think. I have my home, cars, and investments all titled in my Trust.” A little more probing on my part reveals what I expected, that the layperson I am speaking to feels that a transfer of these assets to a vehicle like an estate planning trust, commonly a Revocable Living Trust, is effective protection; it’s not. The first word in the trust is “revocable” and in most cases a judge will simply order you to revoke the trust and tender the assets for a judgment. I’m all in favor of estate planning, the huge new looming estate tax exposure is one of the issues on my client exposure checklist we address every day, but  that is death planning. What has been done about your life planning and the exposures you face every day practicing your profession, driving a car, having children (some driving your car), or having employees…?

I lease all my vehicles through my business and get an awesome tax deduction in addition to asset protection 

Similarly, we often see dangerous articles of personal property like your personal vehicles moved into this structure or others like an LLC or S-Corp that is your primary business, or equally dangerous, into an entity like an FLP that is holding safe and attractive assets like cash, stocks, bonds and other liquid assets. Think about it, if you lease or own your vehicle through your business, you have linked the most dangerous thing you likely do on a daily basis, drive a car, and linked it to either the source of your wealth, your business or in the case of your FLP, the place you keep your wealth. 

I don’t own anything – I gave it all to my wife and kids 

Transferring all of your assets to your spouse and/or children, especially after something has happened, will not protect your assets from a lawsuit. Even if it did protect you from your lawsuits, transferring your assets to your spouse and/or children opens up another Pandora’s Box. Keeping in mind that there are thousands of lawsuits filed daily due to employment grievances, “slip and fall” and auto accidents, consider this scenario:

Let’s suppose that you transfer all of your assets to your 18-year old son who causes an auto accident. Several other cars are involved in the accident and several injuries are incurred. Chances are high that the other parties will come looking for the driver with the deepest pockets. If your son “owns” your house and business, a sympathetic jury will undoubtedly take the possession away from your son in order to teach him a lesson for his reckless driving. The same holds true for spouses, parents and even friends. Also, gifting is limited to about $14K annually, per spouse, per donee. Gifts over that amount must be documented with a gift tax return. Failing to do so will result in you having to answer the question, “Are you lying now re: the date and validity of this transfer or did you cheat the IRS?” A bad place to be in a time of need.

I’m insured and have an umbrella

This is a reasonable and common question we get from clients and advisors alike. In the most egregious cases of arm-chair quarterback misinformation, we actually see uninformed advisors telling their clients that the only Asset Protection they need is a good umbrella policy – THIS IS FLAT OUT WRONG for the kind of successful people we protect. Why? Because they are successful, visible and typically have assets above and beyond just the insurance policy itself, they are good targets from a net-worth perspective.

Our position on Liability Insurance (as distinct from Life Insurance) is pretty simple: Buy as much liability insurance as you can afford, assume it won’t be adequate and have a plan B. Asset protection planning is about layers, redundancy and backstops.

What about my “umbrella” policy? – It is a great idea to have an umbrella policy, in fact, I insist on it for my clients as one of several layers.  You and your liability carrier have different ideas about what umbrella means. To you it means everything, to your carrier it means specific events in the base policy, covered to specific increased limits, and governed by a specific set of exclusions detailed in the fine print of your policy. Clearly two very different definitions. The lesson here is that there is no real way to insure yourself against a universe of possible exposures and have every single one covered to an unlimited dollar amount, nor is this reasonable to expect of your liability coverage.

Some real examples of the “impossible” that actually happened and resulted in large claims: 

  • Parents away for the weekend return to find that a teenager died at their home during a party their child had from the drugs he brought with him results in multi-million dollar wrongful death lawsuit;
  • Chiropractor adjusts a patient’s hip and the woman dies on table from cardiac arrest-he is sued for wrongful death;
  • Long time, most trusted employee of medical practice molests a minor female patient during treatment;
  • Employees of moving company get drunk and severely beat another employee and lock him in company truck in company yard over weekend;
  • LLC for real estate development is pierced and a passive member is held jointly and severally liable for the actions of the other members;
  • Dentist works on elderly patient who goes home and dies of unrelated heart attack hours later, dentist sued for wrongful death. 

SOLUTION – So how do we help make sure that the coverage is enough? Pretty simple – we buy all the insurance we can reasonably afford, make sure we have the appropriate riders and umbrellas in place then we present a hard, uncollectible target beyond the limits of the policy. Most, if not all, lawsuits are motivated by the potential financial gain to the plaintiff and their attorney. In most cases, plaintiffs and their attorneys don’t chase people beyond the limits of the policy if there is nothing else to take or if there is nothing that they can get their hands on with any reasonable certainty.

This article just scratches the surface of what you need to consider when evaluating your exposures, Asset Protection planning and the countless options available. I encourage you to act today, seek experienced counsel, and remember that information in forums like this is not specific to you, is written in the broadest terms and is never a substitute for consulting with an experienced professional.

Attorney Ike Devji has a decade of practice devoted exclusively to Asset Protection and Wealth Preservation planning. He works with a national client base including 1000’s of physicians and business owners often through their local attorney, CPA or financial advisor. Together, he and his associates protect billions of dollars in personal assets for these clients. Ike also regularly writes, teaches and speaks on these issues to executives, physicians and other professionals nationally. See his work in WORTH, Advisor Today, Physician’s Practice and at www.ProAssetProtection.Com.

As always, the information presented here is general and educational and can never replace the advice of experienced counsel specific to your assets or situation. 

Please check out our Book Store for books on financial planning, retirement, and related topics as well as any Amazon shopping needs you may have (or just click on the link below).  The Chicago Financial Planner is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.  If you click on my Amazon.com links and buy anything, even something other than the product advertised, I earn a small fee, yet you don’t pay any extra. 

Photo credit:  Flickr

Asset Protection Tips for Real Estate Investors & Owners

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This is a guest post by Ike Devji, a Phoenix, AZ-based asset protection attorney and one of my oldest online friends.  I have spoken with Ike many times for advice on client asset protection issues and had the pleasure of meeting him in person a couple of years ago when he spoke to my financial advisor study group during a meeting we held in Phoenix.  Though Ike focuses on high net worth professionals and physicians as clients, his advice for “real estate owners, flippers, and developers” is applicable to anyone involved in the ownership of real estate.

Real estate management issues fall into several basic categories: debt, liability, and loss. We provide an introduction to these issues to help you get your house in order below. As many business owners and professionals also have investment in real estate outside their business itself, I’ve included issues of wide applicably.

Debt 

The nature of real estate debt and the significant guarantees that often accompany it can have grave consequences. We’ve covered some of these in detail including the effects of real-estate investments on financial solvency.

Make sure you clearly understand the limits and extents of the personal guarantees you sign. Many investors are signing as “jointly and severally liable” for 100 percent of the total debt when they only own 20 percent of the deal, as one example. Limit your liability share to your ownership share and understand if the loan you are signing for is a “non-recourse” loan or not.

Have your leases, indemnity agreements, and other legal docs drafted by a lawyer, or at least reviewed by a lawyer BEFORE you use them. Asking us what we think after the fact is useless. Always have these agreements reviewed by an experienced real estate attorney. Having your brother-in-law the DUI lawyer look at it could be the most expensive $500 you ever saved.

Don’t sign blanket personal guarantees, be specific in what you agree to collateralize as much as possible or the bank will value what you own at pennies on the dollar and try to take it all.

Get professional accounting help to maximize tax deductions. Use strategies like energy studies and cost segregation studies to reduce your fixed long term costs and maximize what you keep. Some real estate lawyers and accounting firms also offer “lease audits” these verify all the mysterious monthly expense add-ons you may face if you rent rather than own the building, the calculations are often wrong, and not in your favor.

Liability 

Protect yourself from your, clients or patients (or renters, their guests, and business invitees); you are liable for their health, welfare, and safety related to the property and conditions on it. Have specific leases, written policies on conduct and the use of the properties and penalties for violating them. Insure yourself to hilt against liability incurred on the property. You will almost always be more collectible and a better lawsuit target than your renters. That said, don’t ever forget that insurance alone is just one layer of defense and is not adequate protection.

Don’t put too many eggs in one basket. Divide properties based on use, equity, and danger or liability. If you have multiple pieces of property in a single LLC, for instance, remember that ALL of them are potentially at stake for an exposure at one property.

Implement personal asset protection planning and consult with legal counsel on how you are protected and which of your other personal assets are at risk and should be made legally distinct. If he or she says, “just by more insurance” fire them and get better help.

Loss 

Adequately insure yourself against loss and property damage, as distinct from liability. Use only top rated national carriers that you can sue for bad faith if they don’t pay under the policy as they should. Yes, this is common, “bad-faith” lawyers exist for a reason. Remember that vacant property is often not covered by general loss and liability insurance after as few as 30 days if you don’t let the insurance company know and pay them extra.

Get ALL the right insurance. If you are a owner/manager you need general liability, E&O (like professional malpractice), and potentially D&O insurance (directors and officers) if you are a director or officer of a company that may be personally named for professional acts or omissions, i.e. “I made the call that reinforcing the balcony railing was too expensive and not required at the property…”

As always, act today, anything you do after an exposure is more expensive and less likely to work. Be proactive and tactical in defending what you have earned.

Attorney Ike Devji has a decade of practice devoted exclusively to Asset Protection and Wealth Preservation planning. He works with a national client base including 1000’s of physicians and business owners often through their local attorney, CPA or financial advisor. Together, he and his associates protect billions of dollars in personal assets for these clients. Ike also regularly writes, teaches and speaks on these issues to executives, physicians and other professionals nationally. See his work in WORTH, Advisor Today, Physician’s Practice and at www.ProAssetProtection.Com

As always, the information presented here is general and educational and can never replace the advice of experienced counsel specific to your assets or situation. 

Please feel free to contact me with your financial planning and investing questions. 

Please check out our Resources page for links to some additional tools and services that might be beneficial to you.

Photo Credit:  Wikipedia

 

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