Objective information about financial planning, investments, and retirement plans

Financial Independence or Retirement – Which is the Better Goal?

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This is a post by author and financial journalist Jonathan Chevreau.  Jon is at the forefront of a movement he calls “Findependence.”  This is essentially looking at becoming financially independent so that you can pursue the lifestyle of your choosing.  This may be a form of semi-retirement, but the point is to work because you want to, not so much because you have to. Findependence is a process and a journey rather than a big financial event like the traditional concept of retirement.  I agree with Jon’s views on this issue.  Jon is the author of the book Findependence Day, be sure to check out his new site Financial Independence Hub.  

One of the problems with selling the concept of Retirement to young people is that old age just seems so impossibly far away in the distant future. The financial services industry and the mass media love to talk about retirement but let’s face it, if you’re a recent college graduate just entering the workforce, retirement is perceived as something far far in the future, just one step before the equally remote prospect of death. 

Findependence far more accessible for the young than Retirement

The pity is there’s a much better term that could be substituted for Retirement. It’s called Financial Independence or what I’ve dubbed “Findependence.” (simply a contraction of the two words.)

Financial independence is a goal that can be achieved not 30 or 40 years from now but in 10 or 15 years. It’s not unreasonable for a 25 year old just taking their first step on the career ladder and embarking on marriage, family formation and home ownership to set a goal of financial independence (or “Findependence”) by the time they’re age 40. 

Findependence is not synonymous with Retirement

Does that mean “early retirement” at such a tender age? No, because Findependence is not synonymous with Retirement. Most of us know what Retirement is but for a refresher course on Financial Independence, go to Wikipedia and search the term Financial Independence. You’ll find an entry which is simple enough to grasp: financial independence is the state of being able to have enough financial wealth to live “without having to work actively for basic necessities.”

If you’re findependent, your assets generate income greater than your expenses. Note that Findependence is not correlated with age. If you have modest means and have been frugal enough to build up a nest egg in 10 or 15 years, you may well be “findependent” by age 40 or so. Conversely, if you’re a high-earning high-spending professional who requires hundreds of thousands of dollars of income a year, findependence may not be in your grasp even by the traditional age of retirement.

You can see why people often confuse the terms since two ways of generating passive income is often employer pensions and Social Security or other pensions paid by governments. These particular income sources do not begin until one’s late 50s or 60s. But again, if your needs are modest, you might well be able to establish early findependence solely with a portfolio of dividend-paying stocks, perhaps supplemented by part-time jobs or freelance work. 

Boomertirement

For baby boomers, the so-called “New Retirement” will often prove to be a variant of Findependence and traditional Retirement. Very few boomers, even if they have the financial means, will embrace the traditional “full-stop” retirement of their parents who enjoyed Defined Benefit pension plans. The older generation may have experienced the gold watch and a quarter century of golf, bridge, reading but boomers are much more likely to embrace a semi-retirement that consists partly of employer pensions, supplemented by government pensions, taxable investment income and part-time employment income, and perhaps the fruits of certain creative endeavors: royalties from literary or musical creations, licensing fees from various entrepreneurial ventures, fees from serving as corporate directors and other sources of income. 

Jonathan Chevreau is a financial journalist and author.  He is the author of the book  Findependence Day.   The original version of this post appeared on his new site Financial Independence Hub.  Jon is a must follow on Twitter

Should You Accept a Pension Buyout Offer?

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Corporate pension buyout offers have been in the news lately with Hartford Financial Services offering lump-sum payment options to former employees and with Boeing offering a choice of lump-sum or annuity payments to a similar group.

Other major corporations have made similar offers in recent years including General Motors, who actually offered retired employees a “pension do-over.”

The answer to the question of whether you should accept a pension buyout offer is that it depends upon your situation.  Here are a few things to consider.

Are they sweetening the deal? 

I don’t know the details of either the Hartford or the Boeing offers but I have to think they are offering these former employees some sort of incentive to forgo their normal pension and to take the buyout offer.  Perhaps the lump-sum is a bit larger and in the case of the Boeing offer the annuity payments are a bit better.  Or perhaps there normally wouldn’t be a lump-sum option available from the pension plan so this in and of itself is an incentive.

Remember the incentive for the companies offering these deals is to get rid of these future pension liabilities.  The potential cost savings and impact on their future profitability is huge. 

Can you manage the lump-sum? 

The decision to take your pension as a lump-sum vs. a stream of payments is always a tough decision.  A key question to ask yourself is whether you are equipped to manage a lump-sum payment.  Ideally you would be rolling this lump-sum into an IRA account and investing it for your retirement.  Are you comfortable managing this money?  If not are you working with a trusted financial advisor who can help you?

There has been much written about financial advisors who troll large organizations (both governmental and corporate) looking for large numbers of folks with lump-sums to rollover.  In some cases these advisors have moved this rollover money into investments that are wholly inappropriate for these investors.  As always be smart with you money and with your trust.  Be informed and ask lots of questions.

Do you have concerns about the company’s financial health? 

Do you have doubts about the future solvency of the organization offering the pension?  This pertains to both a public entity (can you say Detroit?) and to for-profit organizations like Hartford Financial and Boeing.  In the latter case pension payments are guaranteed up to certain monthly limits set by the PBGC.  If you were a high-earner and your monthly payment exceeds this limit you could see your monthly payment reduced.

While I am not familiar with the financial state of either Hartford Financial or Boeing I’m guessing their financial health is not a major issue.  However if you receive a buyout offer you might consider taking it if you have concerns that your current or former employer may run into financial difficulties down the road.

Who guarantees the annuity payments? 

If the buyout offer includes an option to receive annuity payments make sure that you understand who is guaranteeing these payments.  Typically if a company is making this type of offer they are looking to reduce their future pension liability and they will transfer your pension obligation to an insurance company.  They will be the one’s making the annuity payments and ultimately guaranteeing these payments.

This is not necessarily a bad thing but you need to understand that your current or former employer is not behind these payments nor is the PBCG.  Typically if an insurance company defaults on its obligations your recourse is via the appropriate state insurance department.  The rules as to how much of an annuity payment is covered will vary.

An additional consideration in evaluating a buy-out option that includes annuity payments of this type is the fact that most of these annuities will not include cost of living increases.  This means that the buying power of these payments will decrease over time due to inflation. 

What other retirement resources do you have? 

If you will be eligible for Social Security and/or have other pension plans it quite possibly will make sense to take a buyout offer that includes a lump-sum.  Take a look at all of your retirement accounts and those of your spouse if you are married.  This includes 401(k) plans, 403(b) accounts, IRAs, etc. This is a good time to take stock of your retirement readiness and perhaps even to do a financial plan if don’t have a current one in place.

The Bottom Line

I’m generally a fan of pension buyout offers, especially if there is a lump-sum option.  As with any financial decision it is wise to look at your entire retirement and financial situation and to have a plan in place to manage this money.  Where an annuity is also available you need to understand who will be behind the annuity and to analyze whether this is a good deal for you.  I suspect that pension buyout offers will continue to be offered by more and more organizations seeking to reduce their pension liability.  You need to be prepared to deal with an offer if you receive one.

Pension Payments – Annuity or Lump-Sum?

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I’m often asked by folks approaching retirement whether to take their pension as a lump-sum payment or as an annuity (a stream of monthly payments).  Investment News recently published this excellent piece on this topic which is worth reading.

As with much in the realm of financial planning the answer is that “it depends.”  Everybody’s situation is different.  Here are some factors to consider in deciding whether to take your pension payments as an annuity or as a lump-sum.

Factors to consider 

Among the factors to consider in determining whether to take your pension payments as an annuity or as a lump-sum are: 

  • What other retirement assets do you have?  These might include:
    • IRA accounts
    • 401(k) or 403(b) accounts
    • Taxable investments such as stocks, bonds, mutual funds, or others
    • Cash and CDs
  • Will you be eligible for Social Security?
  • Will the monthly pension payments be fixed or will they include cost of living increases?
  • Are you comfortable managing a lump-sum yourself and/or do you have a trusted financial advisor to help you?
  • What are your expectations for future inflation? 
  • What is your current tax situation and what are your expectations for the future?

Factors that favor taking payments as an annuity 

An annuity might be the right option for you if:

  • You have sufficient other retirement resources and are seeking to diversify your sources of income during retirement.
  • You are uncomfortable with managing a large lump sum distribution.
  • You are not eligible for Social Security.
  • Your pension payments have potential cost of living increases built-in (typical for public sector plans but not for private pensions).

Factors that favor taking payments as a lump-sum 

A lump-sum distribution might be the right option for you if:

  • You are comfortable managing your own investments and/or work with a financial advisor with whom you are comfortable.
  • You have doubts about the future solvency of the organization offering the pension.  This pertains to both a public entity (can you say Detroit?) and to a for-profit company.  In the latter case pension payments are guaranteed up to certain monthly limits set by the PBGC.  If you were a high-earner and your monthly payment exceeds this limit you could see your monthly payment reduced.
  • You are eligible for Social Security payments. 

The factors listed above favoring either the annuity or lump-sum options are not meant to be complete lists, but rather are intended to stimulate your thinking if you are fortunate enough to have a pension plan and the plan offers both payment options.  A full listing for each option would be much longer and might vary based upon your unique situation.

Moreover the decision as to how to take your pension payments should be made in the overall context of your retirement and financial planning efforts.  How does each payment method fit?

Lastly those evaluating these options should be aware of predatory financial advisors seeking to convince retirees from major corporations and other large organizations to roll their retirement plan distributions over to IRA accounts with their firm.  While this issue has seen a lot of recent press in terms of 401(k) plans it is also an issue for those eligible for a lump-sum pension distribution. If you are working with a trusted financial advisor an IRA rollover can be a viable option, but in some cases rollovers have been directed to questionable investment options putting many retirement investors at risk.

Please check out our Book Store for books on financial planning, retirement, and related topics as well as any Amazon shopping needs you may have (or just click on the link below).  The Chicago Financial Planner is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.  If you click on my Amazon.com links and buy anything, even something other than the product advertised, I earn a small fee, yet you don’t pay any extra. 

3 Misunderstood Aspects of Social Security Benefits

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This post was written by Jim Blankenship, CFP®, EA, a fee-only financial advisor and owner of the excellent finance blog Getting Your Financial Ducks in a Row, where he covers IRAs, Social Security, Taxation, and most other aspects of financial planning.  I’ve known Jim for a long time and consider him an expert on Social Security and many other topics.  His blog is must-reading for me and should be for you as well.

The Social Security benefit landscape is a complicated and confusing place to navigate. It’s tough enough to figure out what is the best time to file for your own benefits, let alone trying to coordinate benefits for yourself and your spouse.  There are many confusing provisions of Social Security; below is a brief explanation of 3 misunderstood aspects of Social Security benefits.

Spousal benefits

When one spouse is eligible for retirement benefits, the other spouse is also eligible for a benefit based upon the first spouse’s record.  The largest Spousal Benefit is 50% of the other spouse’s Primary Insurance Amount (PIA).  The PIA is equal to that individual’s benefit available at Full Retirement Age (FRA). Full Retirement Age is 66 for folks born between 1946 and 1954, increasing to age 67 for those born in 1960 or after.

An individual may receive the Spousal Benefit as early as age 62, at a reduced rate. The other spouse must have filed for his or her own benefit – and could have suspended benefits (see File and Suspend below).

The confusing parts. The following areas always seem to trip up folks as they plan for the Spousal Benefit.

  1.  Only one of the spouses can receive Spousal Benefits at a time. The other spouse must have filed or filed and suspended for his or her own benefit.
  2.  At or after FRA, the individual can receive Spousal Benefits alone, separate from the retirement benefit on his or her own record (see Restricted Application below).  This allows the spouse receiving Spousal Benefits to delay receiving his or her own benefit, increasing that retirement benefit (via Delayed Retirement Credits).
  3.  Before FRA, filing for Spousal Benefits will result in a reduced Spousal Benefit. Plus, filing for Spousal Benefits before FRA will result in deemed filing for the individual’s own retirement benefit, with both benefits reduced. 

File and Suspend

When the individual who is eligible for a retirement Social Security benefit reaches Full Retirement Age (FRA), the individual may voluntarily suspend receiving benefits.  By suspending benefits, the individual has accomplished two things:

  1.  The individual has established a filing date for benefits. This means that the Social Security Administration has a record that the individual has filed for benefits. Since that record exists, other benefits become available based upon the individual’s Social Security record. Also, at some point in the future, the individual could change his or her mind and collect retroactive benefits from the established filing date to the present, continuing to receive monthly benefits as if the filing was never suspended.
  2. The individual will not receive benefits while the suspension is in place. If the individual does not collect retroactive benefits at a later date (see #1 above), Delayed Retirement Credits will add to his or her future benefit. This amounts to an 8% increase in benefits per year of delay.

Restricted Application 

As mentioned above, when an individual reaches Full Retirement Age (FRA) and is eligible for a Spousal Benefit, the individual may choose to file a Restricted Application for Spousal Benefits only.  This type of application provides for the individual to receive *only* the Spousal Benefit, based upon his or her spouse’s record. By doing so, he or she can delay filing for his or her own benefit to a later date.  With the delay, the individual’s own benefit will gain Delayed Retirement Credits; maximizing the benefit by age 70.

Jim Blankenship, CFP®, EA, is a fee-only financial advisor.  Check out his blog Getting Your Financial Ducks in a Row, follow him on Google+ and Facebook as well.  

Please check out our Book Store for books on financial planning, retirement, and related topics as well as any Amazon shopping needs you may have (or just click on the link below).  The Chicago Financial Planner is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.  If you click on my Amazon.com links and buy anything, even something other than the product advertised, I earn a small fee, yet you don’t pay any extra. 

Retirement Investors: Poor Timing and Short Memories?

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A recent Wall Street Journal article Retirement Investors Flock Back to Stocks (not behind their paywall as I write this) discussed how retirement savers are putting more money into stocks.  Nothing like waiting for the stock market rally to pass its fifth anniversary, with many of the major market averages in record territory, to get retail investors interested in the stock market.  Two excerpts from this article:

“Stocks accounted for 67% of employees’ new contributions into retirement portfolios in March, according to the most-recent data from Aon Hewitt, which tracks 401(k) data for 1.3 million people at large corporations.” 

What cash I have, I’m going to use to buy more if the market dips,” said Roy Chastain, a 68-year-old retiree in Sacramento, Calif., who put an extra 10% of his retirement account into stocks in September, bringing his total stock allocation to 80%.  Mr. Chastain, who had put all his retirement assets into cash in May 2008, has gradually rebuilt his stockholdings.” 

If I understand Mr. Chastain’s situation, he sold out about half way through the market decline, he likely missed a good part of the ensuing market run-up, and now he’s bulking up on stocks 5+ years into the market rally.  I sincerely hope this all works out for him.

 What’s wrong with this picture? 

Part of the rational cited in this article and elsewhere is that stocks appear to be the only game in town.  At one level it’s hard to argue.  Bonds appear to have run their course and with interest rates at record low levels there is seemingly nowhere for bond prices to go but down.

Alternatives, the new darling of the mutual fund industry have merit, but it is hard for most individual investors (and for many advisors) to separate the wheat from the chafe here.

But a 68 year old retiree with 80% of his retirement investments in stocks is this really a good idea?

I’m not advocating that anyone sell everything and go to cash or even that stocks aren’t a good place for a portion of your money.  What I am saying is that with the markets where they are investors need to be conscious of risk and at the very least invest in a fashion that is appropriate for their situation.

Can you say risk? 

With the stock market flirting with all-time highs and in year six of a torrid Bull Market I’m guessing things are a bit riskier than they were on March 9, 2009 when the S&P 500 bottomed out.

Let’s say an investor had a $500,000 portfolio with 80% in stocks and the rest in cash.  If stocks were to drop 57% as the S&P 500 did from October 9, 2007 through March 9, 2009 this would reduce the size of his portfolio to 272,000.

Not devastating if this investor is 45 years old with 15-20 years until retirement.  However if this investor is 68 and counting on this money to fund his retirement this could be a total game changer.  Let’s further assume this occurred just as this investor was starting retirement.

Using the classic 4% annual rule of thumb for retirement withdrawals (for discussion only retirees should not rely on this or any rule of thumb), this investor could have reasonably withdrawn $20,000 annually from his nest egg prior to this market decline.  After the 57% loss on the equity portion this amount would have declined to $10,880 a drop of 45.6%.

Assuming this retiree had other sources of income such as Social Security and perhaps a pension the damage is somewhat mitigated.  Still this type of loss in a retiree’s portfolio would be a disaster that could have been partially avoided.

Am I saying that the stock market will suffer another 57% decline?  While my crystal ball hasn’t been working well of late I’m guessing (hoping) this isn’t in the cards, but then again after the S&P 500 suffered a 49% drop from May 24, 2000 through October 9, 2002 many folks (myself included) felt like another market decline of this magnitude wasn’t going to happen anytime soon.

Diversification still matters 

I agree with those who say investing in bonds will likely not result in gains over the next few years.  But given their low correlation to stocks and relatively lower volatility than stocks, bonds (or bond mutual funds) can still be a key diversifying tool in building a portfolio.

When I read an article like the Wall Street Journal piece referenced above or hear “experts” advocating the same thing on the cable financial news shows I just have to wonder if investor’s memories are really this short.

Individual investors are historically notorious for their bad market timing.  Is this another case of bad timing fueled by greed and a short memory?  Are you willing to bet your retirement that the markets will keep going up?  Or perhaps you think that you might be able to get out before the big market correction.

Perhaps you should consider doing some financial planning to include an appropriate investment allocation for your stage of life and your real risk tolerance.

Please check out our Book Store for books on financial planning, retirement, and related topics as well as any Amazon shopping needs you may have (or just click on the link below).  The Chicago Financial Planner is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.  If you click on my Amazon.com links and buy anything, even something other than the product advertised, I earn a small fee, yet you don’t pay any extra.

Please contact me at 847-506-9827 for a complimentary 30-minute consultation to discuss  all of your investing and financial planning questions. Check out our Financial Planning and Investment Advice for Individuals page to learn more about our services.

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A Pre-Retirement Financial Checklist

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Are you within a few years of retirement? It’s time to get your financial house in order. Here are several items to include on your pre-retirement financial checklist.

 Review your company benefits  

Your 401(k) plan might be your largest and most significant employee benefit, but there may be others to consider as well. Does your company offer any sort of retiree medical coverage? Are there other benefits that you can continue at reduced group rates?

In the case of your 401(k) you will have choices to make at retirement.  You will need to determine if you want to leave it with your soon-to-be-former employer, roll it into an IRA, or take a distribution. The last choice will likely result in a hefty tax bill, so this is generally not a good idea for most folks.

Do you have company stock options that you haven’t exercised? Check the rules here. Speaking of company stock, there are special rules called net unrealized appreciation to consider when dealing with company stock held in your 401(k) plan.

Do you have a pension from your current or former employer?

While a pension is certainly an employee benefit, I feel that it deserved its own section.  You might have several decisions to make with regard to your pension benefit if you are fortunate enough to be covered by one.

  • Do you take the benefit immediately upon retirement, or wait?
  • If you have the option, do you take the pension as a lump-sum and roll over to an IRA or take it as a monthly annuity?
  • Generally there will be several annuity payment options to consider, which one is right for your situation?  

These decisions should be made in the context of your overall financial situation and your ability to effectively manage a lump sum. Since any lump sum would be taxable, it is usually advisable for you to roll it over into a tax-deferred account such as an IRA. If you have earned a pension benefit from a former employer, be sure to contact your old company to get all of the details and to make sure they have your current address and contact information so there are no delays or glitches when you want to start drawing on this pension.

Determine your Social Security benefits and when to take them

While you can start taking Social Security at age 62, there is a significant reduction in your monthly benefit as opposed to waiting until your full retirement age. Further, if you can wait until age 70 your benefit level continues to grow. If you are married the planning should involve both spouses’ benefits. There are a number of sophisticated strategies surrounding couples and whose benefits to take and when so planning is very critical here.

Review all of your retirement financial resources 

Over the course of your working life you have likely accumulated a variety of investments and other assets that can be used to fund your retirement which might include:

  • Your 401(k) or similar retirement plan such as a 401(b) or other defined contribution plan.
  • IRA accounts, both traditional and Roth.
  • A pension.
  • Stock options or restricted stock units.
  • Social Security
  • Taxable investment accounts.
  • Cash, savings accounts, CDs, etc.
  • Annuities
  • Cash value in a life insurance policy
  • Inheritance
  • Interest in a business
  • Real estate
  • Any income from working into retirement    

Well prior to commencing your retirement it is a good idea to review all of your anticipated assets and determine how they can be best utilized to support your anticipated retirement lifestyle.

Determine how much you will need to support your retirement lifestyle 

While this might seem intuitive you’d be surprised how many folks within a few years of retirement haven’t done this. Basically you will want to put together a budget.  Will you stay in your home or downsize?  What activities will you engage in?  What will your basic living expenses be?  And so on.

Compare this to the income that your various retirement resources might generate for you and you will have a good idea if you will be able to support your desired lifestyle in retirement.  Further you will need to do some planning in terms of which financial resources and accounts to tap at various stages of your retirement.

This is a very cursory “checklist” for Baby Boomers and others within a few years of retirement. This might be a good point to engage the services of a fee-only financial advisor if you’ve never done a financial plan, or if your plan is out of date. Retirement can be a great time of life, but proper planning is required to help ensure your financial success.

Please contact me at 847-506-9827 for a complimentary 30-minute consultation to discuss all of your investing and financial planning questions. Check out our Financial Planning and Investment Advice for Individuals page to learn more about our services.

The Chicago Financial Planner is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. If you click on my Amazon.com links and buy anything, even something other than the product advertised, I earn a small fee, yet you don’t pay any extra. Click on the Amazon banner below to go directly to the main site or check out the financial planning related selections in our Book Store.

 

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How Confident Are You About Retirement?

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Retirement Paradise

The Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) recently published their annual Retirement Confidence Survey.  A few highlights from the survey:

  • The number of workers who say they are confident that they will have enough money to live comfortably in retirement improved to 18% from 13% in the prior survey.
  • The percentage of retirees indicating that they were very confident that they would have enough money to live comfortably in retirement jumped from 18% to 28%.
  • Workers having money in a retirement plan such as an IRA, 401(k), or pension were more than twice as confident that they would have enough money in retirement (24% vs. 9%) than those not participating in a retirement plan of some sort.
  • Worker confidence decreased with higher levels of debt.
  • Worker confidence was higher among workers with higher levels of income. 

Surveys and overall statistics are great, but the reality is that your level of retirement confidence should be driven by your level of retirement readiness.

Retirement readiness questions 

In assessing your level of retirement readiness, ask yourself these questions:

  • How much do I have saved for retirement?
  • How much am I saving each year for retirement?
  • How much will I need to have accumulated by the time I retire to ensure a comfortable retirement?
  • How much will I spend annually in retirement?
  • What resources will I have available to fund retirement other than my nest egg?  This would include items such as a pension and Social Security. 

The impact of debt

According to the survey those workers carrying high debt loads were less confident about their ability to accumulate enough money for a comfortable retirement than those workers with more modest levels of debt.  This is no surprise in that money that goes to service your debts is money that cannot be saved and invested for retirement.

Once you are retired excess debt payments can be a real burden for those on a fixed or semi-fixed income which is a high percentage of retirees.  If the debt, such as a mortgage, is at a manageable level given your retirement cash flow, that’s fine.

What can you do to boost retirement confidence? 

There are any number of things you can do to boost your retirement readiness and your retirement confidence level.  Here are a few:

  • Manage your spending and make cuts where possible.
  • Take full advantage of your 401(k) plan or other workplace retirement plan.
  • Start and fund a self-employed retirement plan if you are self-employed.
  • Manage all of your old retirement plans as well as those of your spouse as part of your overall portfolio.  Consider an IRA to consolidate several old plans in one place.
  • Get a financial plan in place to assess where you stand and to determine any shortfalls regarding where you need to be.   

If it looks like you might come up short relative to being able to fund your desired lifestyle you have some choices to make:

  • Delay retirement or plan to work at least part-time during retirement.
  • Ramp up you savings now.
  • Revise your planned standard of living in retirement. 

In a prior post on this blog Is a $100,000 a Year Retirement Doable? I worked through the math of a hypothetical retiree.  This methodology might be helpful to you as well.

You may or may not like the answer you get when you do the planning and the math for your retirement but at least you will know where you stand.  Knowing where you stand is powerful and can go a long way to improving your confidence about your retirement.

Please contact me at 847-506-9827 for a complimentary 30-minute consultation to discuss  all of your investing and financial planning questions. Check out our Financial Planning and Investment Advice for Individuals page to learn more about our services. 

The Chicago Financial Planner is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. If you click on my Amazon.com links and buy anything, even something other than the product advertised, I earn a small fee, yet you don’t pay any extra. Click on the Amazon banner below to go directly to the main site or check out the selections in our Book Store.

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