Objective information about financial planning, investments, and retirement plans

American’s Attitudes About Their Money

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Americans have varying attitudes about their money. The infographic below sheds light on our attitutudes about our finances across various demographic lines including age and income level.

Please take a look and see how your attitudes about your finances compare.

It’s never too late to get started on your financial plan.  Its never to late to move forward and to take the actions needed to get your financial situation on track whether you need to prepare for retirement or beef up your emergency fund.

Please contact me with any questions you may have or with any thoughts or suggestions about anything you’ve read here at The Chicago Financial Planner.

personal finance
Source: Masters-in-Accounting.org

 

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Comments

  1. More stats: about half of American workers don’t receive retirement benefits at work. Only a tiny percentage of average Americans can save adequately for retirement in the current rigged system, designed by and for the rich. We need systemic changes, not being patted on the head and told to try a little harder.

    • Roger Wohlner says:

      Thanks for your comment. I agree that more access to workplace retirement plans is needed. Where I differ is that it is not the rich trying to keep the little guy down but rather the myriad of government regulations faced by small businesses trying to start and maintain a retirement plan.

      • from cnbc:
        “Even those people with 401(k) plans can’t retire because employers don’t contribute enough. The meager three percent contribution rate is the lowest in the advanced world. Australia’s contribution rate is equal to nine percent of pay. Denmark’s is 11.8 percent, Hungary’s is 8 percent, Mexico’s is 6.5 percent, Poland’s is 7.3 percent and the Slovak Republic’s is 9 percent.”

        I guess employers in the US are stingy because they’re forced to be because of a bunch of onerous government regulations that Denmark lacks.

        • Roger Wohlner says:

          “freed” I always take comments from folks who won’t use their real name or supply a real email address (which you didn’t) with a grain of salt. Clearly you have an agenda but not the courage to tell us who you really are. Feels like I am communicating with an internet toll.

          • Whether I use my full name or an abbreviation has no relevance to the quality of the argument (and, no, I do not give my email address because I already receive enough spam), which you are avoiding responding to. I have to assume you don’t have a good response. btw, I don’t know anything about you other than two blog posts that I’ve read after seeing your site pop up when searching on “frontline retirement gamble”. You weighed in with your opinion on that show so why are you surprised you’ve received feedback? Don’t be so thin-skinned. And my nefarious agenda is a fair retirement system built to benefit the many not the few.

          • Roger Wohlner says:

            “freed” your email address is revealed only to me and I promise I won’t spam you. In this case I was hoping to email you directly so I could get the link to the CNBC piece you referenced. I Googled the info you cited and couldn’t find those stats, I wanted to understand them in the context they were cited so I could comment on them.

            I do agree that the stats that almost half of U.S workers are not covered by a workplace retirement plan and that this needs to change. What I don’t get is how the rich are responsible for this. The costs of running a small company 401(k) plan can be onerous. There are a lot of small business owners who would love to offer a retirement plan but don’t because of the cost and the red tape, much of which are government imposed. There are a number of vendors who are moving in the direction of offering low cost plans so hopefully this will make a dent in that statistic.

            If you really want to do something check out this link and write your elected representative expressing your support for the proposed Fiduciary Standard. http://saveourretirement.com/the-solution/ though you might have to give your real name.

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