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Pens, Trinkets, and Mutual Funds

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McCormick Place

With the annual Morningstar Investment Conference coming up here in Chicago next week, my thoughts naturally gravitate to replenishing my office supply of high quality pens in the exhibit hall at McCormick Place.  Truth be known, my thoughts are more focused on preparing for my participation on a panel on Friday morning called Practical Solutions for a Challenging Retirement Landscape.  Morningstar’s superstar financial author and columnist Christine Benz was kind enough to invite me to participate in this discussion along with representatives from T. Rowe Price and Vanguard.

Pens and Trinkets

Ever since the first financial conference I attended in the mid 1990s I’ve never ceased to be amazed by the number of items that mutual fund providers and other financial services vendors can find to stick their names and logos on.  When my kids were younger they were the only ones in their school with backpacks from places like the Philadelphia Commodity Exchange and the London Stock Exchange.

At one point I had a whole section of T-shirts from defunct mutual fund companies like Strong and Berger.  Add an infinite number of logoed tote bags and baseball hats and you get the picture.  Our kids always liked the stress balls I found at many of the booths (we were obviously tough parents).

In recent years I’ve tried to be more practical at Morningstar and other conferences and focus on gathering a supply of pens for the office.  I always grab as many as I can because my wife and kids always seem to be on the prowl for these as well.

While strolling around the exhibit hall at last year’s conference I was really making a great haul on pens when it suddenly hit me:  There are a lot of companies that offer mutual funds and I’ve never heard of many of them.  And I’m a financial advisor.

How many mutual funds are there? 

According to the Investment Company Institute there were 7,596 mutual funds at the end of 2012.  This is down from the high of 8,305 at the end of 2001.  Add in 602 closed-end funds and 1,194 ETFs and there are lots of choices for investors.

How do you choose the right funds? 

Any selection of mutual funds, ETFs, or any other investment vehicle should start with an investment plan, which is ideally an outgrowth of your financial plan.  Once you have an asset allocation strategy you will want to fill these allocation buckets with funds and ETFs that are appropriate for your situation.

Here are six mutual fund selection mistakes to avoid:

  • Assuming that a “brand name” fund from a well-known fund family is automatically a good investment choice.
  • Relying on lists of top mutual funds from popular magazines or websites.
  • Ignoring a fund’s history.
  • Avoid mutual funds from fund issuers that you’ve never heard of.
  • Assume that all index funds are created equally.
  • Assume that mutual fund companies automatically have your best interests at heart.

Some additional considerations in selecting mutual funds and ETFs:

  • Expenses matter.
  • When using an index product make sure that you understand what index the fund is tracking and that it tracks that index closely.
  • Avoid actively managed funds that are nothing more than closet indexers.
  • When building a portfolio understand the concepts of diversification and correlation.
  • Understand why you are choosing a given fund or ETF, where it fits in your portfolio, and what would cause you to eliminate this holding.

The Morningstar Investment Conference is a great place to catch some excellent educational sessions and to talk to fund and ETFs issuers to learn about their products.  I would be remiss in not mentioning the great work done by Leslie Marshall and her team from Morningstar in staging this conference.  The fact that it always runs smoothly is a tribute to Leslie’s organizational and management skills.

Please feel free to contact me with your investing and financial planning questions.  Check out our Financial Planning and Investment Advice for Individuals page to learn more about our services.   

For you do-it-yourselfers, check out Morningstar.com to analyze your mutual funds and ETFs and to get a free trial for their premium services.  Please check out our Resources page for links to some additional tools and services that might be beneficial to you.  

Photo credit:  Flickr

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Comments

  1. Moneycone says:

    If I had a choice in picking mutual funds, I would simply stick to vanguard and call it a day! I know Schwab and Fidelity have funds that are cheaper than Vanguard, but I would still trust Vanguard more than others.

    • Roger Wohlner says:

      Thank you for your comment. Vanguard is an excellent company and I use their index funds and ETFs quite a bit. However no single fund company is the completely right (or wrong) answer in my experience.

  2. I’ve just gotten into the whole mutual fund/ETF world recently and it can be overwhelming. There are so many options and many of them don’t have very long of a track record which makes them tough to trust. It may not be the best way, but I’ve been picking funds that have been around for at least 10 years and have a competitive return since the fund began.

    P.s. I love taking free pens, but I’m not sure I’ve ever given a company or person my business because they were on a pen I was using.

    • Roger Wohlner says:

      Jake thanks for your comment. It is a real jungle out there in terms of shifting through all of the mutual fund choices available. Investors really need to have a clear idea of their investment objectives and know what they are looking for in terms of a fund.

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